An Alaskan journalist's perspective on local and national issues

Posts tagged ‘Proposition 5’

Prop. 5 Fails, Discrimination Wins

While One Anchorage is not ready to declare that it is over, the writing on the wall seems to be the Proposition 5 (the new proposition that would have amended Title 5, sections 1-8 to prohibit discrimination for things like maintaining a job or getting housing based on sexual orientation) has failed.

A great deal of work has been put into this.  So many people gave so much time and effort.  But, as was seen with Ordinance 64 (the previous version of this bill), this issue showed just how easy it is to rally a bigoted base against a cause that they are “morally” opposed to.

There argument was that this was “inhibiting religious freedom.”  Never mind that the section of Title 5 that dealt with religious institutions, section 9, would not have been affected by this.  Religious institutions could show preferential treatment to whomever they liked.  But the truth didn’t matter to the “Protect Your Rights” campaign.

Their message was that these gays, lesbians and transgendered peoples were going to be like a seedy lot of evil monsters.  This kind of propaganda is nothing new.  When gay marriage has come up in other states, they try to dress it up really nice, talking abour rights and “morality.”  The truth is that we have allowed this government to pretty much openly endorse discrimination.

Such a sad reality, that.  American politicians have openly talked about how homosexuality is wrong.  They talk about how God is the one to look up to, even though we have a 1st Amendment, and his book is filled with some of the worst morals there are.

To people like Jim Minnery, the head of the Alaska Family Council, believe it is a conflict of “values.”  But what values are these people spreading by openly getting people to work against social progress?  They are saying that they value bigotry, because an employer could find out that you are gay and fire you on the spot.  They are saying that they value the spread of hatred, by having the people believe that these kinds of people are not worthy of respect or fairness.  They are saying that they value a system of beliefs that is 2,000 years old, from a desert filled with people that America is also openly discriminating against more than they do decency and kindness.

It’s not a question that there is discrimination against the LGBT community here in Anchorage.  Go to Mad Myrna’s on any day of the week and you can find this out.  Take a look at some of the signs that were being held up at the battle over Ordinance 64 and you’ll see where a good chunk of the population stands.

However, many will argue that most people are not like that.  Most people don’t discriminate, and most people are accepting.  Here’s the problem with that – where were they yesterday?  Now, I will give  that there were problems with the ballots, and this is an issue that I am very curious to see how it is resolved.  I’m not much for conspiracies, but that does seem to be a point of interest.  However, there were options, and the people could have come out in greater numbers.

The fact is that the group who is against gay rights is so much more able to mobilize their voting base, and this is something that progressives and liberals need to learn, because the fact is that the more people think that things will turn out alright, and that they don’t have to get involved, the more we are watching progress in this country get rolled back.

We are in a culture war, and the left is losing.  Badly.  Every compromise, every deal that is struck is only to stave off the madness, while the smaller battles are being won by those who want to get rid of all progress.  This needs to be paid attention to.  But don’t take my word for it.  I’m just a petty journalist who sees the writing on the wall.

Peace out,

Lefty

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Panel discussion on Prop. 5 at UAA shows voter failure

There was a panel discussion about Proposition 5 at UAA tonight.  For the few Anchorage residents who don’t know, there is an issue that is up for a vote on April 3rd.  It is to extend the Title 5 protections, Sections 1-8, to include sexual orientation as a protected status when seeking employment or residence.

Like Ordinance 64, this issue is generating a great deal of criticism from the Christian-right.  The organizations leading the “Protect your Rights” (the opposition) effort are the Alaska Family Council and Focus on the Family.  One Anchorage is heading up the efforts in support of this proposition.

The attendence to this panel discussion was beyond dismal.  There were 23 people in total.  There was nobody from the opposition, including as one of the speakers.  it seems the speaker against it was going to be Daniel MacDonald.  There were two speakers in support, Brett Frazer, and a man named Blake.  MacDonald was all the only opposition, because Jim Minnery, the President of Alaska Family Council, could not find a student to represent the AFC.

Frazer opened by saying that he had a family member (whose name he withheld for privacy reasons) who had been in the military, and was finally able to come out with the veto of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.  However, even with that, she was still discriminated against, both at work and in her daily life.  Her partner feared daily if it ever got out that she was a partner to another woman.  There was a rather appropriate quote by Frazer –

“Discrimination is still very real in Anchorage.”

Next up there was the opening argument by Blake.  He had three points.  The first was that descrimination still exists.  When Mayor Dan Sullivan vetoed Ordinance 64, he remarked that discrimination no longer exists, which was his justification for doing so.  The second was that employees are being fired for being gay.  In some cases, a boss can look at your Facebook page and can use that as a way to find out who you are.  The third was that this wasn’t just hurting people’s livelihoods’, but also doing societal damage.

Since there was nobody to speak for the opposition, the floor opened up to questions.  The first was if a person could be sent to jail or fined because of Prop. 5.  Brett took this, and the answer was – only if they lied to investigators.  However, this had nothing to do with Prop. 5.

The next question was – if there was a case made for discrimination, where was the burden of proof?  Again, Brett took this.  The burden of proof is on the person making the claim.  And they only have a limited window to make it – 180 days.  There is a public hearing (which is an odd term, considering that they are private), which does not fit with the opposition’s narrative that there is no hearing, and the book gets immediately thrown at businesses.

The big question that has been fueling the opposition against Prop. 5 is – will this affect religious freedom?  The answer was obviously no.  Proposition 5 affects Title 5, sections 1-8, but not section 9.  Section 9 is in reference to religious institutions.  Only for-profit businesses will feel the brunt of this.  Of course, it was also brought up – what constitutes a religious institution?  What about religious campgrounds?  Brett and Blake acknowledged that there was some ambiguity in regards to that, but churches were guaranteed to not be affected.  However, Brett made a point that this ambiguity was not a reason to vote against it, but rather to lobby to have some work done on this law.

One point that Brett made was saying what Prop. 5 is not.  It is not, “equal rights for everybody.”  In fact, this does not give the LGBTQ community the same rights as everybody else.  Instead, it gets them 90% of the way there.  This is the best that the gay community could hope for.  That’s depressing enough in and of itself.

Since this was an incredibly fast discussion, because of the dismal attendence and there being no identifiable presence against Prop. 5, they moved on to the closing statements.  Brett said that he didn’t want to wake up on April 4th and find Anchorage the same place it was.  That this proposition needed to pass.

Blake then said that Title 5 works, and the oppositions scare tactics against this Proposition were simply unfounded.  There have been no massive imprisonments and fines.  This law works, and that Prop. 5 needed to be add sexual orientation to the groups of people who can’t be discriminated against.

And that’s it.  Quick, simple, and totally, totally pointless.  There was one attendee, a UAA student named Ceezar Martinson, who had the best thoughts about this.  This night was a complete waste of time for two reasons.  1. the turnout is pathetic.  This is a very clear indicator of how many people actually care about their democracy, and their future.  Even if you knew how you were going to vote, as Brett said, by being in that room, we were already more enlightened than those not in the room, because we were hearing about this issue, and good questions were being asked.

2. The opposition didn’t even care enough to show up.  Everybody seems so sure that this is going to pass.  Everybody I have talked to.  They seem to think that no significant number of people would vote against it.  But as was seen with Ordinance 64, the opposition to this is fierce, and there is a very good chance that this proposition will fail.  And when it does, the voters will have nobody to blame but themselves.  The opposition is real, and they are doing their damndest to make sure that their base is out there, voting against this.

So, if Proposition 5 fails, it will be because when there are people trying to reach out to the community and keep them informed, they don’t even bother to show up, or get the people they know who are confused to go and learn.  This is voter failure, and I am starting to not have sympathy for these people.

Peace out,

Lefty

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