An Alaskan journalist's perspective on local and national issues

It’s not an easy thing to be, to be sure.  While I do respect that fact that a lot of people have died to make this country what it is, there are a lot of problems that I have with this holiday.  The first is this – the idea that all dead soldiers are heroes.

Look, I’m not dogging on all soldiers.  Just like with cops, there are plenty of them that do the job, trying to do the right thing, trying to make things better, and trying to protect their country, even if they are being sent to wars that represent none of those things.  However, they are also plenty of soldiers who are completely psychotic killers who wanted to be given a gun, or jerks who want to have virtually unlimited authority over other people.  To say that every person who has been killed in battle is a hero, you have to make the same statement for the Nazis, or the Huns.  There has to be an understanding that some soldiers who die are not heroes.

The second is that the wars for the last 60 years have been completely and utterly pointless.  The last war that made sense to me as to why it happened was WWII.  Hitler was a monster who was mercilessly killing millions of people, trying to ethnically and ideologically purify the entire planet, and to take over.  The Japanese, while we had cut off their oil, were trying to take over this country.  America was in real danger.  It was clear and present.  What were the Korean and Vietnamese wars about?  Nothing.  It was a mission to stop the Reds from taking over.

Both times, they failed.  They failed for the same reason that Afghanistan and Iraq are failing – because this country invaded a foreign nation, not understanding the determination of the populace to defend their homes.  This nation pointlessly invaded two countries, and in both of them were involved in unbelievably violent and pointlessly brutal wars.  But again, this isn’t the soldier’s fault for being in these wars.  There was a draft back then.

Next up we have the invasion of the Persian Gulf.  This war served no purpose at all.  It was a lot smarter than Korea and Vietnam, since we knew not occupy Iraq and to leave quickly, but it was still a completely useless military action against a nation that stood no threat to us.

However, of all the pointless and brutal wars that have ever been fought, I can see none more pointless and more draining than the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  They were started under false pretenses by a man who was using these wars as a way to exercise his faith and get petty revenge against people who hadn’t wronged this nation, fueled by the mob-mentality that called out for revenge.

All of this said, while these wars were unbelievably pointless, we mustn’t blame the soldiers.  The average soldier can’t help where he ended up.  Blame the systems that drafted them, or the way we got soldiers into Iraq and Afghanistan by screwing them on deployment and back-handedly having those who are just trying to go into the National Guard end up in Fallujah.

The average soldier has only one loyalty when they are in a foxhole.  They don’t care about king or country in that instance.  Their only concern is with their fellow soldiers who are in that foxhole with them.  A lot of brave men and women have died, not defending this country, but defending each other.  If we are going to memorialize something, let us look at that, and pay homage to how many brave people did everything that they possibly could to protect their fellow soldiers and to protect the people who they trusted to protect them.

And for those who did truly die for this country, like the Revolutionaries at Bunker Hill, or the Union troops at Gettysburg, let’s remember them and give thanks for them preserving this nation.

I am anti-war, but I am also understanding enough to realize that this is not the soldier’s fault, and we should be grateful for them sticking with all the BS that the system puts them through, to look out for each other.  But let’s bring them home!  Let’s get them out of harm’s way, so we don’t have to put more men and women in the ground.

Bring them home.

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Comments on: "I am Anti-War on Memorial Day" (3)

  1. “To say that every person who has been killed in battle is a hero”

    François-Marie Arouet (also know by his simpler pseudonym, Voltaire) has an apocryphal quote that goes along the same lines. “He was a great patriot, a humanitarian, a loyal friend – provided, of course, that he really is dead.” Among his other achievements, of course, are several glowing poems about the most vicious senseless conflicts of the French monarchs but I think the sentiment is still the same.

  2. “And for those who did truly die for this country, like the Revolutionaries at Bunker Hill, or the Union troops at Gettysburg, let’s remember them and give thanks for them preserving this nation.”

    That’s what this day is about; remembering those who died serving their country. This holiday doesn’t mean that all soldiers are heroes.

    • No, but that’s what a lot of people think, and anybody who says otherwise is immediately attacked. Like everything else, this is another post going after the absurdities of modern society, and how people look at things. In this country, that could really use some work.

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